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--- In [log in to unmask], Yahya Abdal-Aziz <yahya@...> wrote:
>
>
> 
> 
> Andrew, you've certainly helped me understand something
> about the evolution of our modern prepositions, that I'd never
> even suspected.  Interesting that they all arose in connection
> with verbs of motion, rather than of state or place.  That brings
> to mind a dynamic, even nomadic, culture, whose "normal"
> state of being is one of motion, not of situation.
> 
> I guess that relative to their PIE and ancient IE ancestors,
> the cultures of Europe and India are much more sedentary
> today.  The ancestral societies must have been quite similar
> to the nomadic cattle-herding cultures of today's Africa -
> more particularly so where, as in Vedic India, raising cattle
> was of major economic importance.
> 
> So I'm now minded to take a couple of specfic actions:
> 
> 1.  Find out how the natlangs of today's nomads (herding
> or otherwise, eg African and Australian natlangs) deal with
> situation and motion i.e. what parts of speech express ideas
> of location or movement (now or diachronically), and their
> relative preponderance.
> 
> 2.  Think about how a sessile (agricultural or post-industrial)
> conculture might use ideas of situation and motion, and how
> much of each relative to the other.  I have one fairly sessile
> gatherer conculture with a partly developed conlang that I
> feel could profitably use these ideas in further word formation.
> 
> Thanks for helping me clarify my thinking on these topics.
> 
> Regards,
> Yahya
>   _____
> 
> Yahya Abdal-Aziz


Glad to be of use to another member.

Andrew Jarrette
>