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--- On Wed, 5/6/09, Leo Ki <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> My project, which compounds enormously, needs a way to help
> the listener cut
> phrases into words, and words into morphemes. For instance,
> "han yaki" is
> "forest fire" (han: fire, yaki: forest), but "hanya ki"
> could make sense in
> the future as the language grows: "spreading fire in wood"
> or something.
> 
> In a French/Japanese way, the morphemes han and ki would
> get the pitch
> accent in "han yaki", while in "hanya ki" the accent would
> be on "ya" and
> "ki" or only on "ki". In an English/Spanish way, "han yaki"
> would be
> stressed on han and ya, or just han, and "hanya ki" would
> be stressed on han
> and ki. Chinese could use a distinguish tone on the
> stressed syllables of
> either system.
> 
My a priori project Pesu uses phoneme segregation to isolate morphemes: since /s/ belongs to a class that begins the final syllable (and /p/ does not), the boundaries are clear regardless of stress. And -n marks a bound morpheme, clarifying the word boundaries for compounds. It's not foolproof, of course--slurred pronunciation can still lead to incorrect resolution--but it makes it easy to speak distinctly, which should be good enough.

Steve