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Hi Nuno,

Since receiving your message I've done little else than
use the Internet to learn something about signing, and
in particular, classifiers.

Thanks for your link to "The Interpreter's Friend" site
(http://www.theinterpretersfriend.com/tech/cl.html).
As for it's being pretty - no, it's not.

However, one site I've found of great interest is Dr. Bill Vicars'
"The ASL University":
	http://lifeprint.com/asl101/index.htm

His explanations are clear and detailed.  The site is well
structured and easy to search.  It has an ASL Dictionary:
	http://lifeprint.com/dictionary.htm

Of course, it does cover ASL classifiers:
	http://lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-layout/classifiers.htm

You might also call this site "pretty" - if you like lots of
photos of a middle-aged bald man (personally, I find him
_very_ attractive! - but mostly because of his helpful
personality).  The point of these photos is, naturally, to
clarify the explanations of how to sign various signs,
classifiers and NMM (Non-Manual Markers).

There are also occasionally links to videos, none of
which I've yet watched.

The _linguistic_ treatment of such things as NMMs and
classifiers is a little spotty and occasionally contradicts
what the same site said elsewhere.  I'd personally rather
get one clear explanation of a concept than seventeen
slightly muddled ones ... ;-)  But all told, the site is an
excellent example of the teacher's art, and I have NO
doubt that any well-motivated autodidact could gain a
thorough grounding in ASL from it.

One of the pages describing classifiers did answer my
question: the ASL classifiers for classifying things by their
shapes are indeed very similar to those used in Malay.

Here's my favourite part of the website; in introducing
the ASL Dictionary, Bill Vicars writes:

	"A living language evolves to meet the ever changing
	needs of the people who use it. Lexicography, (the
	making of dictionaries), is like painting sunsets. By
	the time the paint dries the subject has changed. "

Something we could all bear in mind as we try to document
those self-willed linguistic creations, our conlangs!

Regards,
Yahya
  _____

Yahya Abdal-Aziz

Enjoy learning about Uiama, a conlang (constructed language) at:
http://conlang.pbwiki.com/Uiama <http://conlang.pbwiki.com/Uiama>
  _____

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