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On May 27, 2009, at 4:26 PM, Sai Emrys wrote:

> Recently the LCS has been discussing how to provide a service for
> non-conlanger "entertainment industry" people - i.e. primarily movies,
> games, and novels - who may want to use a created language.
>
> There are basically three approaches:
>
> a) we publish a list of people who can make a custom conlang and/or
> orthography quickly, that's tailored to their needs
>
> b) we co-sponsor a contest to make such a language, with the winner
> getting the contract (but this requires significantly more time)
>
> c) we publish a list of conlangs that are available (at least in
> principle) for licensing or outright sale, such that someone can
> easily browse the list and contact the author to obtain the rights
>
> First off: what do y'all think of these? Any better suggestions?

I think (a) and (c) are the most logical—(b) would take too much time  
to implement.
>
> The idea is to get better conlangs used regularly by these industries,
> so that we see more Klingons and fewer Hutteses (and provide a means
> for at least some conlangers to have their work seen by a larger
> audience). Pragmatically speaking, it has to be very easy for them to
> access - otherwise they'll just default to getting some random intern
> or linguist to kludge something over a weekend. (They might be lucky
> and get an Okrand, but that's apparently unlikely, judging by what
> we've seen released in popular media to date.)
>
> Second: would you be interested in being on either list?

In a few years, I very much would. Currently, however, my schedule is  
not amenable to (a) (and will not be until I have finished college),  
and I don't feel that any of my languages are at the level of  
development needed for (c). However, when the time comes that I do  
feel one or more of my languages have reached the necessary level, I  
would be interested in being on the list for (c)—I assume I could be  
added then, even though the list would have been up for awhile?
>
> Neither requires any commitment to terms other than that you're
> amenable to *some* reasonable licensing or work-for-hire agreement, to
> be negotiated between you and them if-and-when. The LCS would only be
> providing a referral service, not being your agent / publicist /
> publisher / etc.
>
> Thanks,
> Sai