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hehe.

It occurred to me yesterday that the "proper" way to do this with
English would be to have separate data sets for words of Anglo-Saxon
origin and words of French/Latin or Greek origin. That way you
wouldn't inadvertently mix "flavors".

--gary

On Wed, May 27, 2009 at 11:44 AM, Eldin Raigmore
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> On Fri, 4 Aug 2006 19:15:41 -0700, Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>>[snip]
>>== English ==
>>[snip]
>>       -> minoctore
>>[snip]
>>       -> vofetishent
>>[snip]
>>       -> siniatude
>>[snip]
>>       -> prolon
>>[snip]
>>       -> staleoventracity
>>[snip]
>
> It might interest you to know that "prolon" does get hits when searched for.
> It's a real word, though it appears to be something between a brand-name or
> a neologism like "aspirin" once was; like a generic name for a drug, only for a
> plastic out of which things can be made rather than a drug.
> Strangely (IMO), though, neither "siniatude" nor "staleoventracity" does.  I
> had had really high hopes for "staleoventracity"; it sounds like it should mean
> something.
> Not-so-strangely neither "minoctore" nor "vofetishent" does.
>