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On Sun, May 31, 2009 at 10:39 AM, Roger Mills <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Charlie wrote:
>
>> > What about "branch water"? As in "Bourbon and branch water"?
>
> From Wikipedia:
> Branch water may refer to:
>
> 1. Water from a stream (a term primarily used in the southern United States).
>
> 2. Water that is steeped with a fresh young branch of a Douglas Fir tree, imparting upon it a distinct piney flavor and a heightened level of oxygenation.
>
> 3. Addition of plain water rather than soda water to a mixed drink (for example, "Bourbon and branch" refers to Bourbon whiskey with plain water).
>
> 4. When a whisky is `cut' (i.e., watered down) prior to bottling, the water that is used is very important to the final product. The preferred source of water is called 'branch water'. Branch water comes directly from the stream that the distillery is built on; some companies even bottle this water, so that bar customers can further dilute their bourbon with the original bourbon water. This branch water starts its life in the underground limestone shelf that exists under most of Kentucky and part of Tennessee. The limestone shelf acts as a natural filter for water that passes over it. Branch water is particular for its lack of character, with no traces of iron or other minerals that would be harmful to the whisky making process.
> =============
>
> Well, that's interesting!!  #1 and 3 have always been my understanding; and as an alternative to soda water in one's drink. My father (Washington state > Michigan > South Dakota)  used the phrase, but in jest, maybe he picked it up from a good friend in town who was from Tennessee-- but OTOH his grandfather (Indiana > lotsa wandering > Iowa > South Dakota) was the son of people who grew up in Kentucky before moving to Indiana. But granddad, we're told, wasn't a drinker :-).........
>
> #2 utterly unheard of
> #3 would be a variant of #1, wouldn't it? but highly interesting in that those two states were the original source of Bourbon whiskey.

I think 3 may be a variant of 4, which in turn is a variant of 1.