Print

Print


Amanda Babcock Furrow wrote:
> On Wed, Jun 17, 2009 at 09:59:13PM -0400, M.S. Soderquist wrote:
> 
>> If you've created lessons for your conlangs, what sort of method did you  
>> follow for that? 
> 
> I once started trying to create mrchi lessons, but I was handicapped by
> my dislike of introductory language lessons!  (I very much hated when
> the Teach Yourself <X> books switched to a more conversational format, and
> years later when used books became so easy to find and buy online I finally
> got myself a "correct" copy of Teach Yourself Finnish with the practice
> texts in descriptive, narrative passages and no annoying "My name is",
> "Where is the train station?" stuff.  (I had first seen the book in this
> edition in the library, but by the time I had disposable income it was out
> in the new, uninteresting edition.  I never forgot the text at the end
> of Chapter 1... ok, I forgot the Finnish version, but the images of the
> sun rising over the town with its tall, white church steeple remained :)
> And a few words, like "ovat korkeat" (are tall?)  And "On y", which 
> was the first sentence, and appears to mean "It is dark".))

Yeah, the modern "Teach Yourself" books with their focus on tourist-type 
dialogs and phrases and not enough on grammar lose my interest pretty 
quickly. I remember a little poem about a little stone house with three 
little windows from the old Teach Yourself Serbo-Croat book. I find 
those sorts of things more interesting than formulaic greetings and 
introductions. But the old Teach Yourself Finnish was pretty 
intimidating with its detailed descriptions of all the rules and 
exceptions for the different cases of nouns and such. Well, at least 
back when I was trying to study it for the first time, not knowing much 
about how languages work, it was intimidating.

I ought to try making lessons for some of my recent languages. I started 
doing lessons for Eklektu, a language I was designing back in 1995-96, 
but I didn't get very far with that.