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Mark Reed wrote: IML it's something like [dZr\aUnd].

Me: [dr\aUnd]. I do not have a transitional fric. in /dr-/, there is (or can be) a slight one in /tr-/, possibly because my /d/ seems to be slightly less alveolar (i.e. backed) than my /t/.  Whether my /r/ is [r\`] or just [r\] is difficult to say, though I suspect the former.

On Fri, Jun 19, 2009 at 11:26 AM, Eldin
Raigmore<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> For rhotic English speakers whose 'lect uses the retroflex approximant for the
> rhotic,
> What's the initial phone or two in your 'lect's pronunciation of <drowned>?
> In particular do you say
> [J\+j\ r\` 6 u n d]
> or
> [d_-+z\ r\` 6 u n d]
> ?
>
> If you don't say either, what do you say?
>
> (I'm using
> J\ as a voiced palatal plosive,
> j\ as a voiced palatal fricative,
> J\+j\ as a voiced palatal affricate,
> d_- as a voiced postalveolar plosive,
> z\ as a voiced palato-alveolar fricative,
> d_-+z\ as a voiced affricate moving back from postalveolar to palato-alveolar,
> r\` as a retroflex approximant,
> 6 as a near-open lax central vowel.)
>
> (Feel free to correct the vowels if I got them wrong.)
>
> "Rhoticity" may have nothing to do with the question;
> but I think the use of [r\`] for /r/ does have something to do with it.
> In case your dialect is non-rhotic you may want to answer the question
> anyway but mention your dialect is non-rhotic;
> and/or, in case your /r/ isn't [r\`], you also may want to answer the question
> anyway, but mention what your usual /r/-phone is.
>
> --------
> Thanks.
>



-- 
Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>