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I didn't know "balk" could be used as a transitive verb! In its intransitive
form it is very familiar to me. Is transitivity a recent development, or do
I just need to get out more? (:
Eugene

2009/6/27 Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]>

> On Fri, Jun 26, 2009 at 4:08 PM, Mark J. Reed<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > On Fri, Jun 26, 2009 at 7:07 PM, Eugene Oh<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >> Interestingly, in my social circles as well as personally, "flighty" is
> in
> >> current use. By contrast, I have never heard of "balky" before.
> >
> > IME, "balky" is used primarily of horses, secondarily of baseball
> pitchers. :-)
> >
>
> Just for fun, here are the five occurrences of forms of "balk" in the
> Brown Corpus:
>
> The education bill appears to be temporarily stalled in the Rules
> Committee, where two Northern Democratic members who usually vote with
> the Administration are balking because of the religious controversy.
>
> But it is tradition rather than the record which balks at the
> expunging of the Tammany name.
>
> He was a political maverick, a reformer with his own program,
> determined to bulldoze it through or to blazon the infamy of those who
> balked him.
>
> Macklin balked again, not wanting to unlock and open the door.
>
> This could be told chiefly from a sort of head-tossing and prancing, a
> horselike balkiness of demeanor.
>
> --gary
>
>
> > --
> > Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>
> >
>