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"Forgetful" I think implies a more general condition than
"absent-minded", but they are near synonyms.  The stereotype is of
course the absent-minded professor: brilliant, keen mind for facts and
figures and whatever he needs to do his work, but no room left for the
common everyday things that most folks remember without trying.

I agree that "flighty" is a current word, not an archaism.  Not one I
personally use much, though.

On Fri, Jun 26, 2009 at 1:14 PM, Paul Hartzer<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Personally, I don't make a huge distinction between "forgetful" and "absent-minded." I suppose there's the notion that absent-minded people aren't simply forgetful of everything, but rather forgetful of things of a low priority to them because they're thinking about other things (the caricature being Albert Einstein, who perhaps apocryphally regularly forgot his home address because he had more important things to think about), but still... I didn't say "flighty" was a synonym of "forgetful," but rather that it implied it, which you're pretty much agreeing with.
>
> Also, I actively use "flighty" in my day-to-day language, so I'm confused about your use of the past tense, as if it's an archaic term.
>
> -- Paul
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>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
>> From: Donald Boozer <[log in to unmask]>
>> While forgetfulness might be a part
>> of the definition, it was more commonly used to refer to someone who was
>> reckless, careless, absent-minded...
>>
>> - Don
>>
>> > Date:    Thu, 25 Jun 2009 11:10:47 -0400
>> > From:    Tony Harris
>> > Subject: Re: Berlitz: (was An interesting format for a
>> > grammar)
>> > As to the specific example, "flighty" is a common enough
>> > English insult which implies forgetfulness. ...
>> > -- Paul
>
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-- 
Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>