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As given, the sentences present all sorts of pragmatic
difficulties for Onju, which is enthusiastically all-drop.  The
repetition of the words "snake" and "mouse" isn't necessary
in connected speech, since I have conjunctions which
encode "same-subject" (ma) and "different but known or
inferable subject" (mn).

Entire phrases can be nominalized (with a few tweaks), and
much vocabulary is created this way...

  ca dil shaugn ko'tse-nji   (c = [tS], j = [dZ])
  house into winter flee-critter, i.e., "mouse"

"Snake" is more easily created from a verb with adverbial
suffixes:

  cor-w-koyi-nji
  move-LONG FLOPPY-side to side-critter

Both are in the non-speaking, animate class, {yo}.

yo corwkoyinji ke yo ca dil shaugn ko'tsenji s m-mbe mi.
ANIM snake SUBJ ANIM mouse OBJ see-PRES DIRECT
(evidentials are obligatory, {mi} marks direct perception)

ma yo ca'lo-ji tuva.
and ANIM eat-INF want
(once tense and evidential context has been established,
formal marking can drop; class markers precede transitive
verbs to mark the class of a direct object when it is omitted)

ma yo kapo-'t-sai 'h.
and ANIM strike-sudden-CONT in-vain
(-sai marks the next step in a series of actions, "and then"
or the like; {'h} is like an evidential, marks an action that
was intended or thought likely but in fact doesn't happen)

mn ko'tse-shul-sai mi.
and flee-AWAY-CONT DIRECT
({mn} marking the subject switch)

ma corwkoyishulsai mi, ma yo lur st otaisai ts.
and slither-AWAY-CONT DIRECT, and ANIM another OBJ seek-CONT SUPP
(the evidential {ts} marks a supposition or possibility,
since I can't know the mind of a snake and can't report
directly on its actions once it's away)

-- 
William S. Annis
www.aoidoi.org  www.scholiastae.org