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Herman Miller wrote:
> I imagine that languages created for fantasy novels have a number of 
> constraints that we ordinarily don't take into consideration in 
> artlangs. Most obviously, they should avoid sounds that English 
> speakers have trouble with, and try to spell things in a way that 
> won't confuse English speakers too badly. Tolkien might have been able 
> to get away with spelling /k/ as "c", but how many of his readers got 
> it wrong on the first reading?
>
Oddly enough, I apply exactly those constraints at least some of the 
time. I've got fantasies about persuading a few of my less 
linguistically-inclined friends to 'play along at home' (i.e. learn some 
of the language du jour), so I sometimes try to make various sketches 
anglophone-friendly from the start. (I do a lot of conlang doodling, 
some of which ends up being worked into my more developed projects, and 
a lot of which gets shoved into drawers.)

So far, my persuasion hasn't worked out, but I am sure it will, right 
after I win the lottery.

> Probably more useful for conlangers would be a "Create a World 
> Clinic", with tips for putting together a consistent background for 
> the speakers of your language. Where are you likely to find mountains, 
> and what effect do they have on the local climate? What does it take 
> to run a civilization of a given size? How does the technology 
> develop? At the very least, before giving your language a dozen words 
> for "snow", you should have some idea whether snow is likely to be 
> found in the climate where your speakers live.
>
That would be an amazingly useful book for me! I'd jump at the chance to 
have a hard copy of something that would help me sort out and firm up 
the vague notions I have about the imaginary places my languages come from.

Mia.