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Eldin Raigmore wrote:
> The problem with using a syllabary, or an alpha-syllabary, for
> English or for several other languages, will be how to denote
> superheavy syllables.
> 
> Syllabaries are best suited to languages with a (C)(V) or
> (C)(V)(V) syllable- structure, or a (C)(C)(V) or (C)(V)(C)
> syllable-structure where one of the consonants is very
> restricted.
> 
> They're certainly possible with (C)(C)(V)(V) or (C)(V)(V)(C)
> syllable- structures, or with (C)(C)(V)(C) or (C)(V)(C)(C)
> syllable-structures where one of the consonants is highly
> restricted; especially if there are also stand-alone 
> consonant-symbols and stand-alone vowel-symbols.  Many
> alpha-syllabary-like abugidas have one or the other or both; a
> diacritical mark on a symbol, like a virama, might indicate "no
> vowel"; another might indicate "no consonant".
> 
> But if the language allows both diphthongal nuclei and
> coda-clusters (as well as onsets); or both onset-clusters and
> coda-clusters; or both onset-clusters and diphthongal nuclei (as
> well as codas); then making and using a syllabary will be a
> problem.
> 
> In general the following kinds of syllables will cause problems: 
> * Syllables with clusters of four (or more) consonants, whether
> in the onset or in the coda. * Syllables with tetraphthongal (or
> longer polyphthongal) nuclei and either an onset or a coda. *
> Doubly-closed syllables with triphthongal nuclei, or
> triply-closed syllables with diphthongal nuclei. * Syllables with
> three-consonant clusters, whether in the onset or the coda, and
> also a consonang at the other margin or a diphthongal nucleus. 
> And so on. In schema, anything as complicated as, or more
> complicated than, CCCCV, CCCVC, CCCVV, CCVCC, CCVVC, CCVVV,
> CVCCC, CVVCC, CVVVC, CVVVV, VCCCC, VVCCC, VVVCC, VVVVC

Realize though that there are phonotactical restrictions in place so 
that not all combinations of clusters are possible.  The amount of 
CCC initals that exist are limited and usually the first consonant 
is /s/, the second an unvoiced stop, and the first is usually /r/ as 
in /spr-/ /str-/, /skr-/.  One could have a set of symbols to 
represent these initials.

When developing Ingli (my English/English-creole based auxlang) I 
made up a chart of possible monosyllables in English by setting up a 
list of "initials" on one axis and "finals" on the other.  The list 
was much shorter than I thought it would be.