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R A Brown wrote:

> I don't think Tolkien is entirely to blame. The inordinately high 
> incidence of /T/ and /D/ in conlangs is helped, surely, by English being 
> the L1 of the majority on this list.

Not just English, but also a handful of other languages that a beginning 
conlanger might happen to read about: Welsh, Icelandic, modern Greek, 
Albanian, Arabic; and Castilian Spanish has /T/. So the fact that /T/ 
and /D/ are globally uncommon might not be so obvious at first.

Still, it's hard to avoid English influence entirely, and I've overused 
/T/ and /D/ in many of my older conlangs. Another English influence in 
my older langs is having separate /I/ and /i/ phonemes. I wonder if 
similarly there are phonemes that are underused in conlangs due to being 
unfamiliar to or difficult for English speakers. Uvular, pharyngeal, 
epiglottal sounds? Implosives?