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Risto Kupsala skrev:
> Dana Nutter wrote:
>   
>>> The orthography looks more like Venutian. They even use X for voiced-s
>>> ([z]). I hadn't seen that before.
>>>       
>> I belive the <x> (<z> in some 'lects) is pronounced /T/ as in
>> Castillian Spanish.
>>     
>
> The book said "voiced-s". The writer also emphasized that <x> is not an
> allophone of <s> in Venetian, apparently implying that it is in some other
> dialects of Italian. But the presentation of the phonology was unclear in
> the book. It assumed good knowledge of Italian and Venetian, which I don't
> have. Using IPA as a universal reference would have helped a lot.
>
> By the way, I remembered that using <x> for [z] is not completely
> unconventional. I recalled English pronunciation of "xenon". And in
> Albanian <x> stands for [dz].
>
> <x> is definitely one of those left-over letters of the Latin alphabet
> that are used in imaginative ways. However it is usually used as a
> consonant, except in Sasxsek where it is a vowel. By the way, Dana, since
> <y> is not used anymore in Sasxsek, have you considered using it for
> schwa?
>   
Yo mirat pri li nůmine Roksana in Polonia, e yo comprende que li x - 
quel es  probabilmen li original - fa li nůmine Roxana = Rozana. E yo me 
questionat, u pronuncia on x = z?

Conclusion: x = z es plu frequent quam on vole imaginar.

Kjell R