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2009/9/5 Garth Wallace <[log in to unmask]>

> On Fri, Sep 4, 2009 at 5:36 PM, Eric Christopherson<[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > On Sep 4, 2009, at 10:49 AM, Eugene Oh wrote:
> >
> >> That is very strange. I use Gmail, probably it assumed some of the
> periods
> >> followed by two letters were URLs. Thankfully the URLS didn't replace
> >> anything, but rather appended themselves after the offending periods.
> >> Eugene
> >
> > True. Oddly, when I copy the URLs and paste them into TextEdit (on my
> Mac),
> > they look just the same as in the email (e.g. http://xn--5ea.ne); but
> when I
> > paste them into Safari (my web browser), they show as intended (with
> > macrons). I also noticed all the URLs start with http://xn-- ; I'm not
> sure
> > what xn-- is. I suppose the other characters are an ASCII encoding of the
> > Unicode character with macron.
>
> xn-- is the prefix for Punycode domains, which is how you get Unicode
> characters beyond the basic ASCII set in domain names. It's meant to
> be automatically turned into text in the appropriate script.
>

Yes, except that some browsers like Firefox don't always do it (on purpose:
Punycode makes it easy for Phishing sites to spoof domain names by using
homographic characters
http://www.mozilla.org/projects/security/tld-idn-policy-list.html). It might
be that whatever software that e-mail passed through used a similar policy.
-- 
Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/