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Interesting tuning system!

One correction: In your list of ratios, the 3/5 should actually be 5/3.
The
system has an interesting sound to it!

I dug out one of the old perl->csound generators I wrote a few years
ago, and
added your tuning system to it. Then I had it crank out a "tune" :)
(these
are algorithmically generated, so they sound kinda random.) If you want
to
hear what it sounds like, you can email me off-list and I'll send you an
mp3.

--------
James W.

On Thu, 03 Sep 2009 09:43 +0100, "Peter Bleackley"
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> staving Herman Miller:
> > Roger Mills wrote:
> > 
> >> At one point I thought Kash music used a 10 note scale, but was never
> >> able to figure out how it would work, so it's been consigned to
> >> antiquity/ritual uses :-)))
> > 
> > Probably one of the best known 10 note scales is Paul Erlich's, 
> > originally described as a subset of 22-note equal temperament.
> > 
> > http://www.lumma.org/tuning/erlich/erlich-decatonic.pdf
> > 
> > It's actually a very usable scale and has its own rules of harmony based 
> > on 4-note chords (which resemble the natural harmonic seventh chords of 
> > styles like barbershop quartet singing). Other 10-note scales exist but 
> > that's a good one to start with. More recently this scale has been 
> > identified with "pajara" temperament (or what I call in the Yasaro 
> > language "nai telek").
> > 
> 
> I recently worked out a 20-note per octave scale, which I call the 
> Heptamodal scale. It's designed to be able to play a major scale in all 
> 12 keys, but with fewer compromises than 12-TET. The ratios are
> 1 16/15 10/9 9/8 32/27 6/5 5/4 4/3 27/20 45/32 64/45 40/27 3/2 8/5 3/5 
> 27/16 16/9 9/5 15/8 2
> 
> I've worked out a keyboard layout for it as well. But since I'm not much 
> of a musician, I have no idea what to do with it.
> 
> Pete