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staving Mark J. Reed:
> But he started with English, where [h] never appears finally.
> 
> On Thu, Sep 24, 2009 at 12:16 PM, un.doing <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> Wouldn't it be more likely to have suh <=> suNa? It isn't likely for
>> voiceless consonants to acquire voicing word-finally.
>> Eugene
>>
No, I started from a hypothetical language that had [k] but not [N] or 
[h]. The mention of English was simply because English [N] and [h] are a 
classic example of two sounds in complementary distribution that are not 
allophones, and I wanted to talk about how a language could evolve so 
that [N] and [h] were allophones.

This, however, leaves a couple of questions. Firstly, the sound changes 
I proposed would eliminate the original [k] from the language. What 
would the likely knock-on effects be? I imagine some sort of chain shift 
going on, but I suppose it would depend what other stops occurred.

Secondly, if we were to encounter a language in which [N] and [h] were 
allophones, how would we describe the phoneme that they were allophones of?

Pete