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If uncertainty of certain kinds is what you mean to indicate by this 
morphology, and you never want to indicate any kind of subordination or 
conjunction by this morphology, you should not call it "subjunctive"; instead 
you should call it "dubitative".


Or maybe you should use one or more of the following;
"hypothetical" if it signals that the speaker evaluates his/her utterance as 
counterfactual, but otherwise possible;
or "dubitative" if it signals a speakerís reservation about the accuracy of his or 
her utterance;
or "assumptive" it if signals the speaker's belief that his utterance is based on 
facts about what is usually the case in such circumstances;
or "speculative" if it signals that the speaker judges from certain facts that his 
or her utterance is possibly true;
or "deductive" if it signals that the speaker judges from other facts that the 
his utterance is probably true.

Or, if you want one inflection to signal all of those, how about "irrealis 
judgement modality"?

See 
<http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsJudgmentModa
lity.htm>
.

"Judgment modality" is an epistemic modality that connotes the speaker's 
strength of inference or degree of confidence in the reality of his or her 
utterance. (Definition modified to allow modality of nouns as opposed to verbs 
or clauses).

"Judgement modality" is the other kind of epistemic modality 
besides "evidentiality".
"Epistemic modality" is a modality that connotes how much certainty or 
evidence a speaker has for his or her utterance.  (Definition modified to allow 
modality of nouns as opposed to verbs or clauses).

I am assuming that the only modality(ies) you want on noun(s) is (are) 
judgement modality(ies).  I am also assuming that the only modality(ies) you're 
talking about inflecting nouns for, doesn't(don't) indicate "this is the fact and 
I'm sure of it and it should be obvious to everyone here". 
 
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"Subjunctive" ought to be reserved for moods, modes, and modalities for which 
one use or purpose is marking that the thus-marked utterance is in a clause 
which is subordinate to (that is, dependent on and embedded in) another 
clause.