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Lee wrote:
> --- On Mon, 9/21/09, Daniel Bowman <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
>> From: Daniel Bowman <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Conlang
>> copyright To: [log in to unmask] Date: Monday,
>> September 21, 2009, 11:24 PM As my previous post mentioned, I 
>> created a conlang for my friend for her novel last Friday.�
>> Originally, I was going to translate a few lines for her in
>> Angosey, but I was afraid that, were she to publish her novel,
>> the publisher would then own the rights to my language.� 
>> Furthermore, if I wanted to publish a story of my own that
>> included Angosey after she publishes hers, I might have legal
>> action taken against me.
>> 
>> Is this a valid fear?� Has anyone else encountered this sort of
>> problem?
>> 
> 
> Yes, this is a valid fear. Happens with software all the time.
> 
> Slap your copyright notice on the work you did:
> 
> Copyright � 2009 Your Name. All rights reserved.
> 
> Technically, you don't need a notice in the US, but it helps in
> situations like yours. Technically, you don't need the "All
> rights reserved," but again, you are giving notice to that future
> publisher you are own what's yours, not them. Technically, you
> don't need the word "copyright" but last time I checked some
> countries will not honor a copyright notice without it. (Maybe
> the publisher has an office in one of those said countries? Not
> that the word will stop anyone from copying anything, but at
> least they can't say you didn't claim ownership.)

IANAL!

Last I read up on the subject, and that was quite a while ago, 
notices were no longer needed due to a number of international 
treaties.  It doesn't hurt to put on though as a CYA meansure just 
in case someone is unclear about your intentions about whether or 
not to distribute you works.