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Paul Hartzer wrote:
>> From: Lee <[log in to unmask]>
>>> From: Daniel Bowman Subject: Conlang copyright To:
>>> [log in to unmask] Date: Monday, September 21, 2009,
>>> 11:24 PM Furthermore, if I wanted to publish a story of my
>>> own that included Angosey after she publishes hers, I might
>>> have legal action taken against me.
>>> 
>>> Is this a valid fear?  Has anyone else encountered this sort
>>> of problem?
>> Yes, this is a valid fear. Happens with software all the time.
>> 
>> Slap your copyright notice on the work you did:
>> 
>> Copyright � 2009 Your Name. All rights reserved.
> 
> I am not a lawyer either. However, it seems to me that created
> languages fall under trademark law and notoriously amorphous
> Intellectual Property law in general, not under copyright law
> specifically. Copyright is for specific works (and works
> substantively similar); you can copyright a dictionary in a
> conlang, you can copyright a poem or piece of fiction in a
> conlang (and what would be protected would be the events in that
> creative work: I couldn't translate the work into my own language
> and then copyright *that*, without the author's permission).

Trademarks wouldn't do it either.  That's for protecting brand 
names, logos and the like.  Copyrights can protect a particular 
creative work like a description of the language or works written in 
the language.  I really don't see where anyone could protect a 
language itself from being used at all without permission though.  I 
t seems that if it was at all possible it would be a patent because 
it's a specific process.