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This is not unheard of.  My youngest child seems to have followed the 
fearful school movement.  First they took down the fun monkey bars 
and climbing structures, the they banned running on the blacktop 
parts of the playground, and, I think, finally banished running at 
recess.

The they had fund raisers in which the kids went out and tried to 
guilt parents, family and neighbors to pay them some set amount for 
each lap they could run.  Of course this was on a lap of about 100 
yds all on grass.  The overly protective parents and teachers 
insisted that the kids keep themselves hydrated, which seems to mean 
that every fat and/or out-of-shape kid stop each lab for water or 
gatoraide.

Of course, with dumbing down exercise, they also dumbed down serious 
things like math and science as well.

Mike


At 12:32 PM -0700 10/1/09, Connie Sadler wrote:
>Yep! Your logic is right on. Actually, I think this school should 
>ban all physical activity - after all, a student could turn an ankle 
>walking too fast across the playground. No biking - no dodgeball - 
>no swimming (might drown) - no PE - no hop scotch - no jump rope - 
>have to make sure that no one gets hurt.  :)
>
>On Thu, Oct 1, 2009 at 6:15 AM, Laverty, Patrick 
><<mailto:[log in to unmask]>[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>Motor vehicle operators can't stop themselves from running over 
>children on bicycles, so we need to prevent children on bicycles? 
>That's insane.
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>From: Brown University Bicycle Commuting List 
>[mailto:<mailto:[log in to unmask]>[log in to unmask]] 
>On Behalf Of Michael McKeown
>Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 2:14 PM
>To: <mailto:[log in to unmask]>[log in to unmask]
>Subject: [BIKE-TO-BROWN] District bans biking and walking to school
>
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>A school district near Albany, NY has banned students from biking or 
>walking to school.
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>The story is not well organized, but the policy seems to have been 
>in place since 1994.  The commotion now is based on one mother who 
>supports her son in his desire to bike 4 miles to and from school on 
>a wide road with ample shoulders (but no official bike lane) that 
>has had no bike vs car accidents in the last 3 years.
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>The world has gone nuts.
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>Back in the middle ages when I was kid (no snow stories), as soon as 
>I learned to ride a bike, I was allowed, even encouraged to just get 
>on my bike if I wanted to go someplace.  I walked to school for 13 
>years, but I rode all over town and beyond on a regular basis.  Now, 
>it seems parents are afraid to let kids do anything.
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>See the examples below about requiring notes from home to bike to 
>school, parent/guardian ride-alongs, and forcing bike riders to wait 
>until all the busses have left.
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>Mike
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><http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/storyprint.asp?StoryID=847190>http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/storyprint.asp?StoryID=847190
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>Some excerpts (emphasis mine):
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>The biking debate started last spring, when school district 
>officials told Kaddo Marino that Adam was violating school rules by 
>biking to class. Walking to the school also is not permitted.
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>Kaddo Marino challenged the policy and asked the school board to 
>change it. The district charged a committee to review the rule, 
>which was instituted in 1994.
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>At the start of school in September, Kaddo Marino thought that she 
>had a nonverbal agreement with school officials to allow her son to 
>ride his bike until a new policy was resolved. But on the night 
>before classes started, school authorities called parents to say 
>that walking and biking to school would not be tolerated.
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>When the pair stuck with their plan, they were met by school 
>administrators and a state trooper, who emphasized that biking was 
>prohibited, Kaddo Marino said.
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>....
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>"Supervised, parent/guardian bike riding may be permitted at 
>specific sites in the future," [Superintendent] White said in an 
>interview Friday. The school has no legal responsibility over what 
>occurs on Route 9, she added.
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>....
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>Route 9 is a state road also called Maple Avenue. The suburban 
>thoroughfare is busy with cars and businesses. It has crosswalks and 
>wide shoulders, but no bike lanes.
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>The accident rate on the road near the school is less than the 
>statewide average for similar streets, and no bike accidents have 
>been reported in the last three years ending Feb. 1, according to 
>Mark Kennedy, regional traffic engineer at the state Department of 
>Transportation.
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>At Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake schools, officials allow elementary and 
>middle school students to ride their bikes to school if they bring 
>in notes from their parents, spokeswoman Christy Multer said. About 
>six to 10 middle school students ride on nice days, Multer said. 
>They park their bikes in racks, and leave after buses depart.
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>Bike to Brown discussion list: 
><http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/bike-to-brown.html>http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/bike-to-brown.html
>
>Bike to Brown website: 
><http://biketobrown.brown.edu/>http://biketobrown.brown.edu/
>
>Bike to Brown discussion list: 
><http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/bike-to-brown.html>http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/bike-to-brown.html
>
>Bike to Brown website: 
><http://biketobrown.brown.edu/>http://biketobrown.brown.edu/
>
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>
>--
>Connie
>Bike to Brown discussion list: 
>http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/bike-to-brown.html
>
>Bike to Brown website: http://biketobrown.brown.edu/

Bike to Brown discussion list:
http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/bike-to-brown.html

Bike to Brown website:
http://biketobrown.brown.edu/