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Jens Wilkinson skrev:
> On Tue, Oct 13, 2009 at 5:37 PM, Risto Kupsala <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>   
>> Kjell Rehnström wrote:
>>     
>>> Finnish and Hungarian have them, ystäväni, baratom, my friend.
>>>       
>> It's the possessive suffix. But in spoken Finnish they have practically
>> disappeared and been replaced by possessive pronouns: "mun ystävä".
>>
>> In Finnish possession is not told as often as in English. For example the
>> English would say "I brush *my* teeth and comb *my* hair every morning"
>> but we would say "I brush teeth and comb hair every morning". The
>> assumption is that if I had brushed somebody else's teeth then I would
>> have mentioned it.
>>     
>
> It's the same in Japanese (except that you don't have to say "I", so
> just "brush teeth and comb hair every morning" is fine. In Finnish do
> you drop pronouns? One other interesting thing in Japanese is that
> passive is not used in some situation where it would be used in
> European languages. In Japanese, you can say "I cut (my) hair today"
> and it means that you went to the barber's, not that you cut your own
> hair.
>
>   
In Swedish you say that you cut you hair, and that does not mean that 
you went to a barber's. To stress that you did it you have to say 
something like "I cut my hair myself."

Kjell R