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On Oct 20, 2009, at 9:47 PM, Eric Christopherson wrote:

> On Oct 20, 2009, at 2:22 AM, Njenfalgar wrote:
>> I have used little tone so far. When I had only just discovered the
>> existence of something like "tone", I have done some experimenting  
>> which
>> surely nobody is interested in. Since knowing better, I have made one
>> language with tone that I am pretty proud of. It is as yet unnamed,  
>> but it
>> goes like this: each stressed syllable gets high or low tone  
>> (unstressed
>> syllables remain neutral) depending on whether the consonant before  
>> is
>> voiceless resp. voiced.
>
> Sorry to nitpick, but "respectively" isn't used that way in English  
> (I assume you to mean "or" or "versus"), and AFAIK when it is used  
> it isn't abbreviated. I wouldn't comment on it except that it can be  
> very hard for non-German-speaking people to guess what it means.
>
> See <http://www.languagehat.com/archives/001173.php>.

It looks like I made some mistakes:
- Njenfalgar was in fact using a construction where "respectively"  
would be used in English (albeit in a different place, in my  
idiolect)- "each stressed syllable gets high or low tone ... depending  
on whether the consonant before is voiceless resp. voiced." I guess I  
didn't read the sentence carefully enough and assumed that "resp." was  
being used here to mean "or" or "in other words", as it sometimes is.  
*That* is the usage that always confused me (until I saw the  
Languagehat post explaining it).
- I offered "versus" as a good alternative, but that doesn't really  
work. Again, I was thinking Njenfalgar's "resp." was just being used  
to point to two alternatives, without respect to any parallelism in  
the sentence as a whole.
- Many people have pointed out that Njenfalgar's usage of  
"resp." (including its placement) occurs often in academic or  
technical writing. I wasn't aware of that.
- The URL at the top of the Languagehat post is dead. I found the page  
living here: <http://transblawg.eu/index.php?/archives/870-Resp.-and-other-non-existent-English-wordsNicht-existente-englische-Woerter.html 
 >.