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2009/10/14 Philip Newton <[log in to unmask]>:
> On Wed, Oct 14, 2009 at 16:03, Julia "Schnecki" Simon
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>                        Julia 8-)
>>                        (who spent the last two weeks learning, and writing about, a craft
>> called "fingerlooping", or "Fingerlooping" in German (no, really), and
>> spent some time wondering whether _finger_ should be treated as a
>> separable prefix (-> "heute habe ich fingergeloopt") or not (-> "heute
>> habe ich gefingerloopt/fingerloopt", depending on whether we treat
>> _finger_ as a prefix at all or whether we'd rather assume _fingerloop_
>> to be one long stem), and finally decided to solve this conundrum by
>> using the traditional German verb _nesteln_, which has 42% fewer
>> letters than the neologism, not to mention 100% fewer things that look
>> as if they might be a prefix of any kind)
>
> Similar problems come up in computing
> ("gedownloadet/downgeloadet/heruntergeladen"?
> "upgedatet/upgedated/geupdatet/geupdated/aufdatiert/aktualisiert"?).
>
> Even worse in the present, where you don't merely have to decided
> where the -ge- (if any) goes, but whether or not to stick the "prefix"
> at the end - does one say "Ich lade das jetzt down / ich date das
> jetzt up"?
>
> Even more curious with the English phrase "back up", which turns
> naturally enough into "Ich backe up"... but the related forms such as
> "upbacken, upgebackt" seem rather comical.

In Dutch, we take this sort of the following way

Downloaden is treated as unseparable, but all of the ones with 'up' in
it are treated as separable (including uploaden, though I've seen that
one unseparable as well).