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On Sun, Oct 18, 2009 at 5:12 PM, <deinx nxtxr> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> R A Brown wrote:
>>
[snip]
>> <c> is perhaps the most odd-ball of the Roma letters; having begun its
>> life representing either /g/ or /k/ (in certain environments), before
>> settling down to /k/ before everything except /w/ in the Classical Latin
>> spelling, it come to be used in natlangs for a whole range of consonant
>> sounds - probably more sounds that any other letter - cf.
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C#Later_use
>
> This is another one, I've considered for use as a vowel on a couple of
> occasions but managed to avoid it.  The most extreme so far was using it for
> [x] or [ç].  Most of my conlangs use it for /tʃ/, if they use it at all.

An early conlang of mine - really just a naming language - used <c>
for an [e]-like vowel, inspired by the similarity of shape of <c> and
<e> (sometimes indistinguishible in my handwriting). I no longer
recall how, or even if, the sound was different from that written <e>.


-- 
Andreas Johansson

Why can't you be a non-conformist just like everybody else?