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><c> is perhaps the most odd-ball of the Roma letters; having
>begun its life representing either /g/ or /k/ (in certain
>environments), before settling down to /k/ before everything
>except /w/ in the Classical Latin spelling, it come to be
>used in natlangs for a whole range of consonant sounds -
>probably more sounds that any other letter - cf.
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C#Later_use
>
>--
>Ray

Given <k>, it is indeed left without any obvious pronunciation & thus
"free", but I wouldn't bet on it having *the* most odd realizations; <x> and
<q> could surely come up with fierce competition! <j> and even <v> also have
some tricks up their sleeves.

Actually, I'm going to go reset that usage survey. Watch these spots:
http://wiki.frath.net/C
http://wiki.frath.net/Q
http://wiki.frath.net/X
…and eventually, I hope, the rest of the Latin alphabet. As of writing this,
I've started the X page; please add your own examples!

John Vertical