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2009/10/15 G. van der Vegt <[log in to unmask]>

> In Dutch, we take this sort of the following way
>
> Downloaden is treated as unseparable, but all of the ones with 'up' in
> it are treated as separable (including uploaden, though I've seen that
> one unseparable as well).
>

That's not true. As far as I know, all borrowings starting with up- are
treated as inseparable. That includes "updaten" (past participle
"geüpdatet"), "upgraden" (past participle "geüpgraded") en "uploaden" (past
participle "geüpload"). I've never heard nor seen them used otherwise (and
given my interest for all things computer-related, I can assure you that
I've seen them often). A quick Google agrees with me: "geüpdatet" and its
common misspellings ("geüpdated", "geüpdate", "ge-updated", etc...) accounts
for nearly 2 million hits. "Upgedatet", "upgedated" and "upgedate" account
for no more than 250000, most of them German rather than Dutch. Dutch
people, by a vast majority, treat such verbs as inseparable.

Dutch separable verbs can be quite a challenge. Recognising which verb is
separable and which one isn't is quite a chore. That has led to some
hilarious (for others) moments, like the time when I said "ik heb
stofgezogen"! The Dutch verb "stofzuigen" means "to vacuum". But although
it's a very transparent combination of "stof": "dust" and "zuigen": "to
suck" - an irregular verb, past participle "gezogen" -, the verb
"stofzuigen" is both regular and inseparable, with past participle
"gestofzuigd"! So instead of saying "I've vacuumed", I basically said "I've
sucked dust". Nowadays I simply say "ik ben klaar met stofzuigen": "I've
finished vacuuming". I can't go wrong with that one! :)
-- 
Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/