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In that case, the simplest statement of the generalization would seem to be:
"a stressed syllable with a voiced onset is low toned; stressed syllables
are high-toned otherwise" and there is no need for any kind of
"respectively" construction.

I don't know a lot about tones, but from what I do know this seems to be a
natural association of voicing and tone.

On Wed, Oct 21, 2009 at 8:21 AM, Njenfalgar <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> 2009/10/21 Dirk Elzinga <[log in to unmask]>
>
> > What happens if the syllable is initial in the word and there is no onset
> > consonant?
> >
>
> >
> <snip some YAELT: Resp-stuff>
> >
>
> Syllables without onset consonant get a glottal stop, making them voiceless
> and thus high. So "woman" is /ot/ [?ot] -> /ot_H/. Since then I have
> thought
> a lot about this, and I have realized I would be hard-pressed finding a
> native Vietnamese (not a loan) word without consonant onset and with one of
> the low tones (huyen, nga or nang). So it may even be a naturalistic sound
> change...
>
> Greets
> David
>
> --
> Raash te feegatpin: nuukazet nhamaru'eng, shayip bŁngnetuk seepiit.
>