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Alternate-history Native Americans, perchance?

On Thursday, October 29, 2009, David E <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Feayran's internal name literally means "Words belonging to the children of
> the moon," where "Children of the moon" is the name of the conculture.
>
> However, "Laaoshte Kimoiatu Aianoi" is a mouthful, so I usually refer to it
> via its external name, Feayran.
>
> The term "Feayran" arose out of the history of the people group. The first
> southern explorer to stumble on their continent mistook a native word for
> the name of the people, mangled it in his transcription to his native
> tongue, and told the world he had discovered the "feayr." Hence, Feayran.
>
> --David
>
> On Thu, Oct 29, 2009 at 2:50 PM, kate rhodes <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> On Wed, Oct 28, 2009 at 12:09 PM, Sam Stutter
>> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > Have people generated names from other words in their language, like
>> "community"
>> > or "people", stemmed it from another internal source or did one word
>> > spontaneously arise? Or are there other ways people have gone about it?
>>
>> In my case the language started with a single word I greet my dog with
>> when I come home from work which is a mutation from saying "hello" too
>> many times in succession. It ended up sounding like "olo". That came
>> to be a greeting as well as meaning "life" and "love" in olo. As it
>> was a good enough word to start the language, and had nice meanings
>> itself, I just used it for the name of the language too.
>>
>> -Kate
>>
>

-- 
Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>