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Well, originally it did just sound "right", that if you were going to  
negate something completely then pæ was the right way to do it. Also,  
if I'm being dismissive, it will likely be the sound I make. However,  
it probably does come from the French "pas" (especially as the  
pronunciation is pretty much the same), and I was just recalling  
school French lessons. To be frank, it's a bit of a mix this language,  
the words for "cat" and "dog" sound suspiciously similar to the  
Mandarin Chinese words for them. Why? I just liked the idea the word  
for "cat" sounded like a "miaow".
>
> So am I right in thinking that Pæ was borrowed from French "pas"? Or  
> is it
> just a coincidence?
>
>
>> Literally (and not entirely grammatically, but, hey, it's a little  
>> spoken
>> nugget): Pæ [general/total negation] ḟrét [worry / concern] ÿr  
>> [plural
>> (approximately greater than 7)]
>>
>>
> "approximately greater than 7"? What other kinds - if any - of  
> plurals do
> you have in your language?
>
>

I developed the plurals and numbers system immediately after a lecture  
on the subject, so scrounged loads of odds and ends into them. One  
section of the lecture was on extended plural systems (which I think  
the lecturer was currently researching, or something) so,  
embarrassingly the language has a singular, dual, trial, paucal and  
plural which ties with the counting system (1, 2, 3, many, lots). I  
liked the idea and thought it might come up on the end of semester  
exam, so I bolted it in, as it were. :)