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Quoting "Mark J. Reed" <[log in to unmask]>:
> Bilbo also became fluent in Sindarin, didn't he? And Frodo learned
> Quenya - he did the Middle-Earth analog of greeting the locals in
> modern Rome using Classical Latin.

I don't really remember... Oh yes, he did.  I think Frodo learn Sindarin also, but I'm not sure. It would be weird to 
speak Quenya in The Third Age, but not to speak Sindarin (like, in your example, speak Latin but no Italian)
 
> On Saturday, October 31, 2009, Toms Deimonds Barvidis
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > Quoting "Garth Wallace" <[log in to unmask]>:
> >> >> Yes, indeed. As human languages go, Quenya is fairly
> >> "mild."
> >> >> It's certainly a darn sight easier than ancient Greek!
> >> >
> >> > It is.  Not as easy as, for instance, Esperanto, but
> there are
> >> indeed
> >> > many natlangs that are more difficult.  The idea that
> Elvish
> >> languages
> >> > are extremely intricate and impossible to master for mere
> mortals
> >> > definitely does not hark back to Tolkien.
> >>
> >> IIRC, Aragorn was fluent in Sindarin as well as his native
> language of
> >> Westron, so Tolkein definitely did not hold that belief.
> >
> > Indeed he was.
> > The people of Gondor also had spoken Sindarin in their days of gold,
> so apparently you don't have to be  a direct
> > descendant of thousand-years-old linage-of-superhuman-kings to speak
> the Grey Elven.
> >
> >
> > --
> > In mist and twilight I shall linger
> > ~TDB~
> >
> 
> -- 
> Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>