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On Fri, Nov 13, 2009 at 12:24 PM, Adam Walker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> I was thinking about C-an soups last night and realized I haven't invented the word for soup yet.  When I strted looking at Romance words for soup I found the etymologies interesting.  It seems every one has sopa/zuppa/suppa/soupe/supa which comes from a Late Latin SUPPA meaning "bread soaked in broth" which comes from a Germanic word meaning "sop" (and giving English both _sop_ and _sup_ as native words and _soup_ as a loan form French).
>
> What confuses me is how this word came to be a word for soup in all the Romance langs when it didn't mean that in Late Latin.  How did they ALL modify it the same way.  Surely one of them must have made the change in semantics and then everyone else borrowed it, but neither my Snaish nor my French etymological dictionaries mention an intermediate step between LL and their respective langs.
>
> Arguing against that is the fact that some of the Romlangs seem not to have another word for "soup." While those that do have other words derive them from really disperate sources _caldo_ from Latin for "hot," _minestra_ from Latin for "to minister," _brodo_ from Germanic, _potage_ "the stuff in a pot," _veloute_ "velvety," _consomme_ "something consumed."
>
> Should Carraxa have the word _supa_ just to be conformist?  should it do something odd?  Should it borrow from Arabic or keep a Punic root?  Or retain the Latin JUS?
>
> Adam
>
> Nivechigadu ul omu fi nu nul cunsiju djuls ímfius avevad amvuinadu, fi ni nal via djuls pecadorus avevad pedizadu, fi ni nul sedigu djuls zagagadus avevad xedjidigadu.
>
> Saumu 1:1
>

IIRC, from a book on medieval cooking a college roommate once took out
of the library, by the middle ages the term was used for what is now
called sopa seca (that is, rice mixed with chopped vegetables and
cooked with a bit of broth to moisten), and then was repurposed to the
newly popular practice of cooking chopped food in a larger amount of
broth. The languages had become distinct by that point, but styles of
cooking hadn't yet (aside from available ingredients, European cooking
was fairly homogenous, and national cuisines as we know them today
wouldn't diverge until much later, especially the Age of Exploration
when exotic spices and edible members of the nightshade family became
available).