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I'd love to make a conlang book, even if it was just a grammar or  
something fairly "unimaginative". Although, guessing by my current  
translation speeds (I'm desperately trying to translate a Christmas  
address for the conlang card exchange and it's taking me FOR EVER) a  
whole book would take ages to do! As for details like that, my  
conculture approaches books in a fairly contemporary way, although,  
you might be interested in this ( http://www.heraldicclipart.com/ ).
I guess conculturally, it depends upon the language really. I guess  
mine would be pretty much akin to modern Britain (who print more books  
per person than anywhere else in the world apparently) with newspapers  
and the internet with the same battle continuing... But concultural  
books in terms of actually doing it, I guess vanity publishing (as  
sordid a business as it might be) is probably the best bet for most  
people, but seeing as you can bind yourself, I suppose that's not  
really the issue.
I spend some of my time knocking together concultural "Discovery  
Channel" style magazines in English (which is pretty much my  
conculture's lingua-franca) just to help me flesh out the world. So  
perhaps travel journals, with maps / diagrams / sketches of flora and  
fauna. What kind of culture does your language come from?

On 24 Nov 2009, at 20:00, Daniel Demski wrote:

> Google does not yield much for "conlang bookbinding" :). Has anyone
> here created anything? I've long enjoyed bookbinding and a handmade
> book would seem like the perfect conculture artifact to try and
> create. However, I'm not sure yet how my culture approaches books-
> scrolls? hardcover? If covered, bound books, what goes on the cover? I
> think maybe for expensive, well-made books, memorable quotes from the
> book should go on the outside, and possibly illustrations. Maybe a
> symbol, a little like a coat of arms, should be used instead of a
> title.
>
> Lesser books, if they have any sort of worked cover, might use quotes
> from more serious literature.
>
> Anyone else have thoughts on conculture books?