Print

Print


<deinx nxtxr> wrote:
>> Ubuntu has been pretty stable for me, although when I had a Dell 
>> Inspiron 1100 laptop I admit getting the X-windows drivers working 
>> took some work (worked out of the box on CentOS though).  Right now 
>> my desktop and my current primary laptop (a Dell Mini-A9) are both 
>> Ubuntu.  9.04 was quite good, 9.10 which is on the desktop is 
>> somewhat iffier.
>
> I think you meant 8.04, which is what I have.  I tried different 
> varieties of it (Xubuntu, Mythbuntu, both x86 and AMD64 versions) and 
> I just never was quite satisfied with the result, and never could get 
> it to install on my current box.  I never even got to the point where 
> I could start working on getting it conlang ready.  My MythTV machine 
> worked fine except for no decent driver for my tuner, and the wireless 
> was always cutting off spontaneously.  It's sad that hardware vendors 
> don't pay more attention to the Linux section of the market by 
> creating reliable drivers.
>

No, I really mean 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope).  8.04 was good too, but 9.04 
added support for a number of things and made things more stable.  I 
have 8.04 on the desktop at work, and the Dell Mini-A9 came with 8.04, 
but I rebuilt that with 9.04 and it's been very good.  I upgraded the 
home desktop to 9.10 (Karmic Koala) and haven't been as happy, but from 
the news I've seen I'm hardly alone.

> Believe it or not, I actually ran 2000 server up until about a year 
> and a half ago with hardly any trouble.  2003 never worked right 
> because some software detected "server" and refused to run.  Don't now 
> why it didn't under W2k.  I reluctantly went to XP when I bought new 
> hardware only because I could be sure of driver support.
>
I did notice that.  Mainly when I wanted to use AVG Free as the 
anti-virus on the server (of course with the Linux boxes I don't have to 
worry about anti-virus like you do with Microsoft's stuff).  ClamAV is 
okay on the W2K3 server, but does have a couple issues with false 
positives on Excel executables it seems.


> I got off Outlook about a year ago.  I don't need Exchange at home. 
>  All my personal domains are hosted by GMail so I can use IMAP to get 
> to them.  As a result I switched to Thunderbird (didn't care for 
> Evolution), and can say I'm reasonably happy with it, especially when 
> I noticed my UTF-8 e-mails were no longer being mutilated.
Yeah, Evolution is awful.  Thunderbird is my personal email client at 
this point, since I can use the same setup on Windows, Mac, and Linux, 
and sync the contacts, tasks, and calendar using SyncKolab.  I do use my 
gmail account for a second (well, actually the primary) calendar, though.