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Hi!

Garth Wallace writes:
>....
> Ilion puts all nouns used as noun adjuncts into the genitive case
> (which means some prepositions, such as those for location, can govern
> either the oblique or genitive case, depending on whether they modify
> a verb or another noun). ...

Qþyn|gài does the same.  In fact, since there's only one class of
words, so no distinction between adjectives, verbs, and nouns, it puts
any modifier in genetive case.  In a sentence, though, there are
roughly two categories: the predicate and its arguments.  Usually,
you'd translate the predicate as a verb and the arguments as noun
phrases, but the structure goes deeper: a relative clause, for example,
modifying a noun, is simply a relative clause in genitive case, i.e.,
the predicate itself can (and must) be put in genitive case to
modify a noun.  The co-indexing with the main clause is done by
a gap in the relative clause.  This is very similar to Mandarin Chinese
relative clauses, that use the 'de' particle just like in possessive
constructions.

**Henrik