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--- In [log in to unmask], David McCann <david@...> wrote:
>
> On Wed, 2009-11-25 at 07:12 -0500, Mark J. Reed wrote:
> > On Wed, Nov 25, 2009 at 5:34 AM, Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
> > <tsela.cg@...> wrote:
> > >> DOES your majesty want another glass of wine?
> > >>
> > >>
> > > Shouldn't that rather be:
> > > Does HIS/HER majesty want another glass of wine?
> > >
> > > I always thought "your majesty" could only be used as a term of address,
> > > i.e. a vocative.
> > 
> > No, that's not true in the English style. Or if it is, I've only been
> > exposed to writers who got it wrong.   "Would your majesty care for
> > another glass of wine?" would be perfectly acceptable when addressing
> > the Queen of England..
> 
> Rather old-fashioned, I believe. The first time you address the Queen,
> you say "your majesty", and subsequently "ma'am" [m`ːm], as a vocative.
> Otherwise, I think second person address is acceptable: "Would you care
> for another glass of wine, ma'am?"
>

This is going farther than I had intended.  I was merely giving an example of grammar, not a lesson in etiquette when addressing her majesty.  Or anybody's majesty for that matter.

Charlie