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<deinx nxtxr> skrev:
> Paul Bartlett wrote:
>> On Wed, 9 Dec 2009, Kasia Majda wrote:
>>
>> [trim for brevity]
>>
>>> Woulnd't it just be, because esperanto was accidentally at the right
>>> place at the right time? When other, maybe even better, languages
>>> were created, esperanto was already there with an established
>>> position. Maybe it is not a matter of which language is the better
>>> one at all?
>>
>> I think that there is an element of being "at the right place at the
>> right time."  As I pointed out my my essay "Thoughts on IAL Success"
>> http://www.panix.com/~bartlett/thoughts.html , theoretical perfection,
>> according to someone's notion, is not all there is to the spread and
>> use of a constructed international auxiliary language (conIAL).  What
>> is better, that there be at least some auxiliary language, even if the
>> dreaded :) Esperanto, or that there be none, unless some ethnic
>> language such as English (presently) or Mandarin (possibly) take over
>> the world?
>
> At his point I'd vote for English.   Not that it's the best candidate 
> but it's already well one it's way to becoming the language that 
> unites humanity.  It could easily reach that point within a two or 
> three generations whereas the E-o, or any other conauxlang, movement 
> could never catch up in time to truly be of much use.   China may soon 
> dominate the world economically but I wouldn't expect that to stop the 
> tide of English because it's just too strong now.  It's already 
> surpassed the point of being an ethnic or national language and moved 
> on to become a true auxlang.  In fact if you do a search for TEFL 
> positions you'll find the bulk of the jobs are in China.  The Chinese 
> too are learning English.
>
There is a theory I have that the Chinese will learn English to a very 
great extent, and that is a kind of merging Chinese, the understanding 
of the language, with English. When lots of Chinese speak English it 
will be easier for Chinese to change places with English, 'cause there 
will be a readiness for understanding "Western Chinese", which will be 
what lots of people will speak for a very long time.

Kjell R