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On Fri, Dec 25, 2009 at 12:52 PM, Benct Philip Jonsson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Gary Shannon skrev:
>>>
>>> From my "Yet Another Phonetic Alphabet" project, my latest heresy is
>>
>> to ask "Is Y ever anything but a vowel?" My conclusions are based on
>> studying the captured waveforms and Fourier spectrums of pairs like:
>> "oe yoe", "ae yae", "eh yeh", "u yu", "ah yah" etc.
>
> How would you then distinguish between
>
> "Snap your boring"
>
> and
>
> "Snappy or boring" ?
>
> Are you really pronouncing those identically?
>

The only distinction I can detect is the placement of a slight pause,
or a slight elongation in the duration of the E sound at the end of
"snappy" as a clue that it is not attached to "or". The e sound at the
beginning of "your", which to my ear is identical, is somewhat shorter
in duration only, giving the clue that the E is attached to the "or"
of "your".

When spoken normally, without consciously trying to make the
distinction, I can detect no difference in the sound of the two
phrases. The real test is to speak either phrase quickly into a
recorder and then ask an independent third party to write down what
words he hears in the recording. Or better yet, double blind by asking
one subject to speak the phrase "Snap your boring" without any
knowledge of the existence of the other phrase, and have a different
subject speak "Snappy or boring" into the recorder without any
knowledge of the existence of the first phrase. Then have a third
party with no prior knowledge of either phrase judge whether the two
recordings are or are not speaking the same phrase.

My contention is that in a series of such double blind trials a vast
majority of independent blind judges will hear no meaningful
difference between the two recorded phrases as spoken by the majority
of a number of different speakers, and will interpret them both as
saying the same phrase.

In those cases where the judges CAN detect that there are two
different phrases I think it would be found that a significant pause
was inserted by the speaker between "snappy" and "or", or between
"snap" and "your". The two phrases in those cases might more properly
be written "Snap, your boring" and "snappy, or boring". Without
inserted inter-word pauses I contend that the judges will not be able
to distinguish between the two.

==

And on a different topic, I've discovered that I also need a symbol
for glottal stop (^) to properly represent my manner of speaking.
Department is not d@partm@nt but d@par^ment IML. (Bottle, however is
not ba^L, but bad@l IML.)

--gary