Print

Print


The secret organization that was always hounding John Doe (in the TV series
of the same name) used American Sign Language instead of speaking, in order
to prevent voice identification of the members. Once the main honcho (for
us, anyway) was found out, he told the others that it didn't matter if
anyone heard them.

stevo

On Mon, Dec 28, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Gary Shannon <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Mon, Dec 28, 2009 at 1:22 PM, Brett Williams <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > Actually I do think there can be some benefit to a language with a
> > very small community of users.  For instance I highly value the fact
> > that there are only a few speakers of Lojban.  When I speak publicly
> > on the internet in Lojban, there is a sense of intimacy and privacy
> > that's hard for me to find anywhere in English.
>
> A thought triggered by random neurons firing: Suppose, for a moment,
> that the world of Harry Potter were real. Would we not expect to see
> the magical folk speaking a "secret language" of their own to avoid
> being overheard by muggles? Even the muggle-born would have to learn
> this language at Hogwarts, I suppose.
>
> To what extent have past "secret societies" used their own secret
> language? Are there any historical precedents for such a phenomenon? I
> know cults often use their own buzz words and code phrases, but have
> any actually devised languages that we know of?
>
> --gary
>