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On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 6:04 AM, Jens Wilkinson <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 1:04 AM, MacLeod Dave <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Sure they do. Put any adult in the same situation (24hr immersion for
> >> 10 years) and they would always, always beat the child to fluency.
> >> Remember we're talking about a situation where the adult is also
> >> crassly mocked for making errors. No holds barred.
> >>
> > Oh, and there's also no escape either, no giving up on the immersion
> > program, since children can't just up and give up on their lives
> > either.
> >
>
> I think that's sort of the take-home lesson here, which is that
> comparing child learning to adult learning isn't really fair. They're
> completely different situations. Another interesting but not
> interesting tidbit is that many adults end up failing in their
> attempts, whereas children never do (unless they are deaf or have a
> serious intellectual disability). The situation is totally different:
> children don't have the option to give up. So to say that children are
> better at language learning than adults, or vis versa, is not really a
> very interesting statement.
>
> However, I do think that there are elements that make languages easier
> for adults to learn, in ways that don't apply to children. And since
> an auxlang is sort of by definition intended to be a universal L2, an
> auxlang should be more concerned about what is easy for adults to
> learn than children. For example, regularity.
>
>
> --
> Jens Wilkinson
> Neo Patwa (patwa.pbwiki.com)
>

Hear, hear! I was never bugged in a language class so much as when I was
required to attend Berlitz Portuguese lessons. The Berlitz method (learn as
a child does) was so inappropriate but the teacher was contract-bound not to
vary (though she took pity and provided relief occasionally).
---larry