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Peter Bleackley wrote:
> staving R A Brown:
>>
>> In fact <h> had fallen silent even in the Classical period by IIRC the 
>> end of the 1st cent BCE. Possibly it continued to be sounded by the 
>> educated in formal settings for some time, but it's a safe bet that by 
>> the end of the 1st cent CE it was completely silent. It's generally 
>> pronounced in the 'restored' pronunciation to help spelling   ;)
>>
> In his Confessions, St Augustine mocks lawyers (whom he had been 
> involved in training during his career as a rhetor) for being more 
> concerned with the correct pronunciation of "homo" than the effect that 
> their words had on their fellow "homines". This seems to indicate that 
> you were expected to pronounce <h>, at least in court, up to the 4th 
> century AD.

Lawyers were ever an odd lot    ;)

/h/ must have sounded very effected at that time. I assume 
it was the initial _h_ that Augustine was on about and not 
the quantity of the final -o (originally long, but later 
shortened according to the principle of "iambic shortening")

-- 
Ray
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Nid rhy hen neb i ddysgu.
There's none too old to learn.
[WELSH PROVERB]