Print

Print


Hello. 
It doesn't mean anything. It's only used in this context. The word for 'and' is 'ocus' - very clearly unrelated.

Elliott



----- Original Message ----
From: Charlie <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Tue, March 2, 2010 1:21:26 PM
Subject: Re: Odd use of the conjunction "and"

But what does 'assa' mean by itself?
Charlie

--- In [log in to unmask], Elliott Lash <erelion12@...> wrote:
>
> Not all languages use 'and' here. Old Irish has the special conjunction 'assa' (often clipped to 'sa'):
> 
> mó (as)sa mó  'bigger and bigger'
> messa (as)sa messa 'worse and worse'
> 
> Elliott
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: Jen Runds <evil.jen@...>
> To: CONLANG@...
> Sent: Mon, March 1, 2010 2:45:44 AM
> Subject: Re: Odd use of the conjunction "and"
> 
> On 1 March 2010 12:46, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
> 
> > It just struck me that the use of "and" doesn't seem to make any sense
> > in phrases like "bigger AND bigger", "faster AND faster", "I got
> > closer AND closer, being more AND more careful to be quieter AND
> > quieter." How can something be both faster AND ALSO faster. I can see
> > faster AND louder, but if it's faster it's already faster. It's like
> > saying the sky is blue AND blue. Everything after "and" is devoid of
> > new meaning. And yet we seem to understand what is implied.
> >
> > I haven't given any thought to how to convey the same general meaning
> > in any of my own conlangs. Have any of you given any thought to this?
> >
> > --gary
> >
> 
> One way to conceptualise it that I find handy is to remember that language
> is also somewhat iconic, eg. plurals tend to be longer than singular. So to
> me something like "faster and faster" represents faster over time (ie
> accelerating), with the repetition standing in for the time aspect. And that
> could lead to all kinds of funky constructions in your conlangs.
>