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----- "Andrew Jarrette" <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
> On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 09:34:06 +0100, Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]> 
> wrote: 

> >On Sat, Mar 20, 2010 at 12:35 AM, Douglas Koller <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
> >> ----- "Andrew Jarrette" <[log in to unmask]> wrote: 
> >>> On Fri, 19 Mar 2010 09:45:18 +0100, Andreas Johansson <[log in to unmask]> 

> >> The Swedish thing is an elusive beast, a combo of /x/ and /S/?. I raised 
> this question a few years ago here and was told that /x/ would pass until I 
> got it right ("station" /staxo:n/). 

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPLPy2Eb2dQ&feature=related; 
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHRCGJLIs0k&NR=1; 
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP-mqb1iFso&NR=1 

> Anyway, I think it's something Swedes should be proud of (and probably are), 
> I don't think any other language has anything quite like this sound, apart 
> from when it sounds near to /hw/ as in Agnetha Fältskog's lect (or perhaps 
> her own personal variant?). 

God, I love Swedish. I was listening closely, but this issue we've been discussing was just not on my radar. I *did* pick up on something I raised here many years ago; she said something with a deeply nasal /i~/, like "bil" with a sinus condition but I doubt it was that (I believe I was told that that's "Southern"). I've watched other stuff in Swedish or other Scandinavian (like "Babette's Feast") and the language is reasonably transparent or certainly opaque; this interview...she might as well have been speaking Urdu but for every fifth word. Makes me want to strive harder. 

Kou