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On Wed, May 5, 2010 at 12:55 PM, Douglas Koller <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> ----- "Roger Mills" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > On Tue, 4 May 2010 21:47:54 -0500, Eric Christopherson <
> [log in to unmask]>
> > wrote:
>
> > >Final glottal stop for /t/ does, to some extent. In my speech I think
> it's
> > mostly an allegro phenomenon, but I'm not sure.
>
> > I think it's quite common, but esp. in allegro.
>
> In my idiolect, certainly in allegro speech, final "p", "t", and "k", don't
> appear as glottal stops. The tongue is in the appropriate POA, but the
> plosive release of air doesn't occur. To my delight, as I was learning
> Cantonese, it works the same way. So, "kap" sounds like "cup", "git" sounds
> like "git" (which in American is more often used for "Scram!" than "idiot")
> and "lak" sounds like "luck". I was so thrilled!
>
> That said, those syllables in Shanghainese reduce those endings (Taiwanese
> straddles the fence) to the glottal stop. Beware English speakers, by your
> great grand-childrens' time, it will be a fixture. :)
>
> Kou
>

What do you mean by "Taiwanese straddles the fence"?  Taiwanese is full of
phonological oddities, but I'm not sure what you meant here.

Adam