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On Sun, May 2, 2010 at 7:13 PM, Chris Peters <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
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>> Date: Mon, 3 May 2010 00:42:07 +0000
>> From: [log in to unmask]
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>> > Isn't speaking of THE language of the Klingons like speaking of THE
>> > language of the humans. Surely Kronos was a large enough planet to
>> > have more than one culture and more than one language.
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>> > --gary
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>> I have the same question about the planet in "Avatar."
>> Charlie
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> On Klingon:  the intro to Okrand's dictionary states exactly that:  there are multiple languages/dialects spoken by the Klingon people.  Whichever one is "official" depends on the political situation on the homeworld at the time -- the language spoken by the current emperor becomes the official language of the Empire.  (Thus, most Klingons are well advised to be multilingual.)  I'm not sure how well that's been acknowledged in Star Trek canon, but there it is.
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> On Avatar:  Paul Frommer is on record stating that he'd probably have to address the question of dialects if and when the sequel is produced.  Linguistic diversity wasn't necessary for the first movie's storyline, since the Na'vi characters in the story (at least the ones with speaking lines) were all members of the same Hometree.  If other Hometrees have a role in future storylines, then there would probably be some variation introduced in their languages.

Other groups did get recruited for the climactic battle, but it was in
montage and we didn't see or hear much about how they communicated.
One supposes that if there was any language barrier, they would have
gotten around it via their biological USB ports and/or the
Treenternet.