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http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:List_of_Proto-Indo-European_roots#s

German "setzen" and English "set" aren't listed per se, but I'm confident
they are also related directly.

  **sed-*
to sit *OCS* сѣдѣти (sěděti), *Russ.* сидеть (sidet'), *Polish* siedzieć, *
Lat.* sedeō, *Lith.* sėdėti, *Ltv.* sēdēt, *Gaul.* essedum, *Eng.*sittan/sit,
*Gm.* sizzan/sitzen; sezzal/, *ON* sitja, *Goth.* sitan, *Gk.* ἕζομαι (
hezomai)/, *Ir.* saidim/suidh, *Welsh* seddu, *Skr.* सीदामि (sīdati),
*Av.*nišaðayeiti,
*Pers.* niyašayadan/nešastan, *Arm.* նիստ (nist), *Old Prussian* sīdons, *
Umbrian* sersitu, *Toch.* sätk/

stevo



2010/5/4 Tony Harris <[log in to unmask]>

> Actually that would be "Sit on this", and if a tack is pictured then that
> would be implied.  Yes, I presume "сид-" is a cognate to "sedis" and "seat",
> as well as other things like "setzen".
>
>
>
> On 05/04/2010 02:38 PM, Charlie Brickner wrote:
>
>> In today's comic strip "The Elderberries", Ludmila the cook says, "Сидите
>> на этом."  From the context I think she is saying, "Sit on a tack."  Am I
>> right?  Would 'Сид-' then be cognate to 'sedis,' 'seat,' etc.?
>>
>> Charlie
>>
>>
>