Print

Print


On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 23:54:13 +0100, Matthew Barnett 
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>Zeinelabidin Elhassi wrote:
>> On Sun, 27 Jun 2010 08:58:43 +0200, Kjell Rehnstr?&#246;m 
<[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Vincent Pistelli skrev:
>>>> I know that it is a weird sound, but it is probably one of the easiest
>>>> sounds to make.  I don't see why it couldn't be included in a potential
>>>> auxlang for any reason besides its weirdness.  Any child or adult can blow 
a
>>>> raspberry, but a lot of people can't produce a trilled r or voiced velar
>>>> fricative.  It could be useful due to its ease of production. Just a though,
>>>> what are yours?
>>>>
>>>>
>>> Seems to be the sound we produce in order to stop a horse. All Swedes
>>> cannot pronounce it.
>>>
>>> Kjell R
>>
>> Sometimes it's possible to simplify a sound just like when some worldlangers
>> take some words from Arabic. And there are sounds that cannot be 
simplified.
>> And speaking of rare sounds, I remember reading about an interesting 
language
>> that is heavily spoken with clicks like the running horse. I don't remember 
which
>> language it was exactly. I wasn't researching ,but just reading.
>>


>Perhaps you're thinking of Xhosa, or the language of the San Bushmen.

Te' te'  
This is a very common click in my mother tongue. It means No.
I don't know how to write it exactly even in Arabic. My mother tongue , the 
Libyan Arabic dialect is not a written language. It was really funny when we 
first wrote it widely, 6 or 7 years back on the internet. Now it's not funny any 
more.