Print

Print


I really like basecamp for coordinating a disparate group of people;  
it is intuitive and is streamlined. There are some thing that could be  
better, but for communication and filesharing with a bunch of people  
across different departments, it works well.

I know several places that are using Jira, and I think UCLA library is  
going to start using it, so I will get to test it out.

Lisa

On Aug 15, 2010, at 10:19 AM, "John T Young" <[log in to unmask]>  
wrote:

> For what it's worth, as someone else with little knowledge of
> programming, I second Stephanie's recommendation of basecamp.  My only
> caveat is: make sure you keep saving your revisions, because if you  
> get
> lost in thought and spend more than an hour on a given page it kicks  
> you
> out and all your work gets lost.
>
> John
>
> On 14/08/2010 15:55, Schlitz, Stephanie wrote:
>> Dear Toma,
>>
>> In recent projects, I've benefited from collaboration with a  
>> programmer who insisted we use a project management tool. We've  
>> used both Assembla (http://www.assembla.com/) and Basecamp (http://basecamphq.com/ 
>> ) and have had success with both. Each is freely available up to a  
>> certain level of use but thereafter charges a monthly fee (e.g.  
>> Basecamp small projects level = 24 USD/month).
>>
>> Assembla (from my non-programmer perspective) would be the better  
>> of the two for code-heavy projects and offers some nice out-of-the- 
>> box configuration models (http://www.assembla.com/catalog).
>>
>> Re: "I know that it's practically impossible to implement a no- 
>> email policy and have the whole project communication take place in  
>> a dedicated space, but wouldn't it be easier to create  
>> documentation for the project along the way, as issues arise and  
>> get resolved?"
>>
>> Using an online workspace saved us a lot of grief where task  
>> assignments, documentation, and deadlines were concerned; project  
>> users also generally configured their user settings so that we  
>> received email updates as tickets were assigned, completed, and as  
>> documents were checked in and out, etc. So while I still relied on  
>> email, I used it to receive updates/reminders/etc. but generally  
>> not as the primary mode of communication.
>>
>> In both cases, once the project workspace was in place (our  
>> programmer set up the project environments), none of the project  
>> participants had difficulty, regardless of level of technical  
>> expertise, contributing and participating.
>>
>> Good luck with your project,
>>
>> Stephanie Schlitz
>>
>> ________________________________________
>> From: TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) public discussion list [TEI- 
>> [log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Тома Тасовац  
>> [[log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2010 6:31 AM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: project management tools for encoding projects
>>
>> Dear colleagues,
>>
>> I will be starting a project next year (if the grant money comes  
>> in, of course) which will include a TEI encoding component with  a  
>> number of people from different institutions with different levels  
>> of technical expertise, different interests and different  
>> expectations in terms of the end-product.
>>
>> I am wondering if members of the TEI community, who have themselves  
>> been involved in digitalization and encoding projects, have ever  
>> used online project management tools to orchestrate the whole  
>> extravaganza? Any tips or recommendations about the tools I should  
>> look at?
>>
>> I know that it's practically impossible to implement a no-email  
>> policy and have the whole project communication take place in a  
>> dedicated space, but wouldn't it be easier to create documentation  
>> for the project along the way, as issues arise and get resolved?
>>
>> Ok, I am ranting… but my question still holds: project management  
>> tools, anybody? Stories of success or utter failure?
>>
>> All best,
>> Toma
>> —————————————————————
>> Toma Tasovac
>> Center for Digital Humanities (Belgrade, Serbia)
>> http://humanistika.org • http://transpoetika.org
>>