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On a Manchester note,
I must say, that despite the R.P. (please excuse the "for dummies" transcription, I'm on someone else's computer) *man-chest-uh* it's usually pronounced *man-chuhs-tuh*, which is suprising (it aught to be *man-chuhs-uh*, because the Mancunian accent tends to replace non-initial "t" with a glottal stop).
What always confuses visitors is my town / city district 's name: Altrincham *ol-tring-um*. The home of the people of some guy who's name started with 'Alt...'

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From: Constructed Languages List [[log in to unmask]] on behalf of Eugene Oh [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: 04 September 2010 08:41
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: YAEPT: Gloucester and Worcester

On 4 Sep 2010, at 03:47, Eric Christopherson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Sep 3, 2010, at 7:43 PM, Peter Collier wrote:
>
>> ...shire    .../S@/    -    e.g. Worcestershire    /wUst@S@/
>
> Where/when would one say /SI@/ instead of /S@/? Does that depend on the accent of the person saying it, or is it built into the pronunciation of the place?
>

Never, IME. Always [log in to unmask] Compare "sheriff" < shire reeve.

>>
> Also, _-chester_ is pronounced /tS)Est@/, not /tS)@st@/, right? I believe it has a full vowel in US usage. My personal style is to use a full /{/ in _Lancaster_, but I think the place in Pennsylvania is pronounced locally as /"l{nK@[log in to unmask]

I've heard both reduced and full vowels. But the reduced form dominates.

>
>>

Eugene